Calling all Women’s Fiction Lovers! Complete the Survey and Win!

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Hello to all you women’s fiction lovers out there! I’m carrying out a survey to get your valuable views on what makes a women’s fiction novel the best ever experience for you.

I don’t know if you’re like me, but sometimes I find it difficult to find books I really want to read. Maybe that’s partly why I write what I do – because these are the type of books that really grab me. My fantasy reads that transport me to an entirely different world; one where I’m completely hooked on the characters and what’s happening to them.

 For me, romance on its own isn’t enough.

If there’s a romance in a story, that’s fine, and if I care about the characters I’ll root for them. But on its own? No, it doesn’t do it for me. (I realise I might be in the minority, as romance novels sell like proverbial hot cakes).

I want something more than that though.

I want to read about women who are overcoming challenges of all kinds, not just the romantic kind. Women who are rebuilding their lives or challenging themselves, or dealing with complicated issues. About secrets and how they can eat away at relationships or self-esteem like a cancer. And personally, I’m quite happy to accept events that might not happen in real life if the author helps me to believe in them. Magic, I suppose.

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The compulsion factor

So, right now I’m on a quest to find out more about what other women’s fiction fans want from women’s fiction. I want to see whether I can find people like me, which would be very nice, but also to find other books and authors who can stir and move me, and make me read hungrily into the night. So, I’ve put together a short survey on Women’s Fiction, and, to entice you to spend a few minutes answering my questions, I’m offering a £20/$20 Amazon voucher to one lucky respondent.

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Click image to give your valuable opinion and to be entered into a draw to win a £20/$20 Amazon Gift Card.

So, what are you waiting for? if you enjoy reading good women’s fiction, let me know what matters to you and where and how you enjoy reading by clicking on the link. Oh, and if you have a fantasy place to read, I want to hear about that too!

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Where’s your fantasy place to read? Tell us!

Thanks so much. I can’t wait to read your answers.

Bye for now.

Margaret 

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Who’s View is it Anyway?

This blog has been a bit silent of late – that’s because I am flying towards the end of the first draft of The Dare Club and have been responding to the best tip for a writer on how to complete a novel I know – that of ass on Chair. Or arse, if you’re from the UK. Apologies for the language!

But as the end of the first draft comes into view, I’m starting to anticipate some of the feedback I’ll get from the lucky people who will be privileged to read this first effort. The Dare Club is written – as is The Goddess Workshop – from 4 different points of views. In both novels I have started out using one point of view per chapter to give the reader the opportunity to really get to know that character. Then, as the story progresses, I have sometimes switched mid character to another point of view, making this shift as smooth as possible by the use of gaps and asterixes and use of names etc. For me, this is fine – I think it adds to excitement and interest, but I have found that not everyone agrees with me. Some people would prefer me to stick with the one viewpoint per chapter method.

In both The Goddess Workshop and The Dare Club there are plenty of scenes where all the viewpoint characters are present together. Then I have to choose which of the character’s viewpoints the scene is going to be told from. I find this interesting and rewarding. Hopefully my readers agree with me!

Just lately there has been a very interesting discussion about viewpoint on ROMNA, the cyber forum of The Romantic Novelists’ Association. The majority of writers who took part thought multi viewpoints and switching viewpoint mid chapter where fine, which was very encouraging! And Janet Gover shared an excellent technique that she uses to keep track of all the different viewpoints. I always leave a first draft to brew for a while before I go back to it to make revisions – that way I find I can see it better and I’m not afraid to make changes or cuts. But when I’m ready to look at it again, I definitely intend to use Janet’s method to keep tabs on my viewpoints. Here’s a link to her blog so you can see what she suggests.

http://janetgover.com/?p=3471

What do you think about multi-viewpoints and how to manage them? I’d love to know!

www.margaretkjohnson.co.uk

Twitter: @margaretkaj

Facebook: Margaret K Johnson Author

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Available from Amazon as an Ebook and a paperback

Building my website and getting ready to publish

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I have been very busy learning new skills this week – first of all I had to learn to put hyperlinks into the Word document of The Goddess Workshop ready for it to be loaded onto Amazon. I had no idea how to do this, and couldn’t work out what to do from Microsoft Help. Then I found a brilliant video on YouTube – E book formatting tips by JoHarris0n. After I’d watched it about a zillion times, I finally twigged what to do, and did it! What a sense of satisfaction!

Then I turned to my website – only started doing this yesterday, so still involved in this particular challenge. I wanted to use a free site that would let me use my own domain name. I’m using Weebly – at least at the moment – and had great fun downloading suitable pictures from istock (including the picture of primulas above, which has great relevance to one of the jokes in the book – not saying what at this stage!)

The challenge continues today – bring it on! Have you set up your own website? What were your challenges? And what was the most challenging thing for you about getting your book ready for Kindle? I’d love to know.

In other news, my follow-up book The Dare Club has been up for review by the members of The Womens’ Fiction Crit Group on http://www.authonomy.com. This has been an amazing experience – so much valuable insight! I have been moved by the time and trouble people have taken with their feedback, and I’m feeling really inspired to get on with the book just as soon as The Goddess Workshop and my website have been launched. Thanks, ladies! (Oh, and one man!)